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New Scientist

Jun 18 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

New adventures in time • The mysteries of the fourth dimension are a never-ending source of fascination

New Scientist

Bird flu hits UK seabirds • Deadly avian influenza is spreading in the UK’s globally significant populations of gannets and geese, reports Adam Vaughan

Rewinding the Milky Way • The European Space Agency has released a new tranche of data from its Gaia space telescope, and now we can look back into the history of our galaxy, finds Alex Wilkins

Net-zero pledges for countries and firms are on the increase

No sign of a machine mind yet • Claims that an AI has become sentient have sparked excitement, but the reality is more mundane, reports Matthew Sparkes

Debate about the source of evolution’s diversity may have been settled

AI finds evidence of human fires from a million years ago

Strange new type of time crystal has been created

Dinosaur may have had a reptile version of a belly button

An epigenome-editing injection • Switching off a gene in mouse liver cells lowered cholesterol and should cut heart disease risk

Brain can be a few degrees hotter than the rest of the body

Mysterious cold blobs discovered hiding in a star

UK government admits its Net Zero Strategy doesn’t add up

Umbilical cord stem cell therapy treats rare disease

Physicists have made a quantum boomerang

Trees protect Raphael paintings • Dirty air that threatens Renaissance frescoes in Italy can be cleaned up by leaves

Test shows which bio parent gave you each bit of your DNA

Mental health crisis response team cuts crime rates in Denver

Proof quantum computers can be faster than normal ones

Covid-19 link to development delays • Catching the virus in pregnancy may affect an infant reaching their milestones

Baby coral ‘planted’ on the base of offshore wind farm

Monarch butterflies are doing well in North America

Space telescope hit by rock, but all is OK

Human skin used to coat machine digit

Really brief

Control centre for fever is discovered

Thousands of new viruses discovered in the oceans

Bacteria help larvae to eat polystyrene

Healing encounters • Social media’s rise means policies requiring anonymity in organ donation are obsolete, say Nicholas Murphy and Charles Weijer

No planet B • The biodiversity diet I thought my Mediterranean-style diet was helping the planet, but while it has reduced my carbon footprint, it is harming Earth’s biodiversity, finds Graham Lawton

Life on the brink

Your letters

Making sense of the world • Our neat ways of measuring feel like they have always existed. A romp through history shows it is much messier than that, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Defying the ravages of age

How big can they get? • Explore googology in a brilliant new guide and learn about the esoteric world of enormous numbers, says Timothy Revell

Don’t miss

Creativity and chaos • While David Cronenberg’s new movie intrigues, it is a missed opportunity to create compelling, transgressive sci-fi, says Davide Abbatescianni

MYSTERIES OF THE FOURTH DIMENSION • IT IS WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC OF THE UNIVERSE. IT EXERTS A PROFOUND INFLUENCE ON OUR LIVES. YET WE KNOW PRECIOUS LITTLE ABOUT ITS TRUE NATURE AND THE...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jun 18 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 16, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

New adventures in time • The mysteries of the fourth dimension are a never-ending source of fascination

New Scientist

Bird flu hits UK seabirds • Deadly avian influenza is spreading in the UK’s globally significant populations of gannets and geese, reports Adam Vaughan

Rewinding the Milky Way • The European Space Agency has released a new tranche of data from its Gaia space telescope, and now we can look back into the history of our galaxy, finds Alex Wilkins

Net-zero pledges for countries and firms are on the increase

No sign of a machine mind yet • Claims that an AI has become sentient have sparked excitement, but the reality is more mundane, reports Matthew Sparkes

Debate about the source of evolution’s diversity may have been settled

AI finds evidence of human fires from a million years ago

Strange new type of time crystal has been created

Dinosaur may have had a reptile version of a belly button

An epigenome-editing injection • Switching off a gene in mouse liver cells lowered cholesterol and should cut heart disease risk

Brain can be a few degrees hotter than the rest of the body

Mysterious cold blobs discovered hiding in a star

UK government admits its Net Zero Strategy doesn’t add up

Umbilical cord stem cell therapy treats rare disease

Physicists have made a quantum boomerang

Trees protect Raphael paintings • Dirty air that threatens Renaissance frescoes in Italy can be cleaned up by leaves

Test shows which bio parent gave you each bit of your DNA

Mental health crisis response team cuts crime rates in Denver

Proof quantum computers can be faster than normal ones

Covid-19 link to development delays • Catching the virus in pregnancy may affect an infant reaching their milestones

Baby coral ‘planted’ on the base of offshore wind farm

Monarch butterflies are doing well in North America

Space telescope hit by rock, but all is OK

Human skin used to coat machine digit

Really brief

Control centre for fever is discovered

Thousands of new viruses discovered in the oceans

Bacteria help larvae to eat polystyrene

Healing encounters • Social media’s rise means policies requiring anonymity in organ donation are obsolete, say Nicholas Murphy and Charles Weijer

No planet B • The biodiversity diet I thought my Mediterranean-style diet was helping the planet, but while it has reduced my carbon footprint, it is harming Earth’s biodiversity, finds Graham Lawton

Life on the brink

Your letters

Making sense of the world • Our neat ways of measuring feel like they have always existed. A romp through history shows it is much messier than that, finds Chris Stokel-Walker

Defying the ravages of age

How big can they get? • Explore googology in a brilliant new guide and learn about the esoteric world of enormous numbers, says Timothy Revell

Don’t miss

Creativity and chaos • While David Cronenberg’s new movie intrigues, it is a missed opportunity to create compelling, transgressive sci-fi, says Davide Abbatescianni

MYSTERIES OF THE FOURTH DIMENSION • IT IS WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC OF THE UNIVERSE. IT EXERTS A PROFOUND INFLUENCE ON OUR LIVES. YET WE KNOW PRECIOUS LITTLE ABOUT ITS TRUE NATURE AND THE...


Expand title description text