Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

New Scientist

Jun 11 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Getting real about 1.5°C • Only by admitting our failure can we really tackle climate change

New Scientist

Monkeypox unnoticed? • The virus variant responsible for a worldwide outbreak may have been circulating in people for years, reports Michael Le Page

Facing up to climate reality • Our goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C is no longer realistically possible. Should scientists and politicians say as much, and if so, what comes next, asks Adam Vaughan

Overshoot world

Return to the moon to start with test of lunar space station orbit

Chickens were domesticated later than we thought

Hepatitis outbreak still a mystery • Hundreds of hepatitis cases with no known cause have now been reported in children globally

Aliens could send us interstellar quantum messages in X-rays

AI translator makes it easier for computers to do maths

Strong family ties encourage children to flourish socially and intellectually

Termites spread by crossing the oceans on driftwood rafts

Advanced computer goes public • Only a few quantum machines have achieved “quantum advantage” – the ability to beat conventional computers – and now one is online for anyone to use, says Alex Wilkins

Baby leatherbacks struggle to find the sea on dark nights

Damaged liver repaired in machine before transplant

Great whites could have wiped out megalodon

Ants trained to sniff out breast tumours

Sex change seen in live-birth animal

Really brief

Some disease risks rise with your height

School road noise slows gains in attentiveness and memory

Robo falcon makes a great bird scarer

Adding to the team • AI is becoming smarter all the time, but mathematicians needn’t fear they will be replaced by machine intelligence, argues Junaid Mubeen

Field notes from space-time • Why planes fly We physicists want to give everyone a feel for what we are learning, but the truth is that physics and intuition don’t always mix, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Fragile beauty

Your letters

Living by numbers • Can big data help us make better life decisions? A thought-provoking book says it can – but Elle Hunt finds some important holes in the argument

The ascent of mammals • The story of the evolutionary origin of mammals is told with elan in this clear, engaging book, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The film column • The need for speed Part war film, part techno-thriller, Top Gun: Maverick might lack narrative realism, but this 1980s nostalgia-fest is still a thrilling display of aeronautical stunts, featuring some very fast planes, says Simon Ings

Lifting the fog • Brain fog is a nebulous concept that eluded scientific scrutiny – until covid-19 thrust it into the spotlight. Kayt Sukel reports

Virunga power • Green electricity is empowering people, reducing conflict and helping to conserve mountain gorillas in the heart of Africa, finds Adam Popescu

Dangerous work

Gorilla killers

Virtually famous • Computer-generated influencers look, sound and post on social media like real humans. What impact are they having on people who follow them, asks Tevy Kuch

How to bake bread that keeps • The science of why bread goes stale isn’t fully understood. But it can help us...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jun 11 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 9, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Getting real about 1.5°C • Only by admitting our failure can we really tackle climate change

New Scientist

Monkeypox unnoticed? • The virus variant responsible for a worldwide outbreak may have been circulating in people for years, reports Michael Le Page

Facing up to climate reality • Our goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C is no longer realistically possible. Should scientists and politicians say as much, and if so, what comes next, asks Adam Vaughan

Overshoot world

Return to the moon to start with test of lunar space station orbit

Chickens were domesticated later than we thought

Hepatitis outbreak still a mystery • Hundreds of hepatitis cases with no known cause have now been reported in children globally

Aliens could send us interstellar quantum messages in X-rays

AI translator makes it easier for computers to do maths

Strong family ties encourage children to flourish socially and intellectually

Termites spread by crossing the oceans on driftwood rafts

Advanced computer goes public • Only a few quantum machines have achieved “quantum advantage” – the ability to beat conventional computers – and now one is online for anyone to use, says Alex Wilkins

Baby leatherbacks struggle to find the sea on dark nights

Damaged liver repaired in machine before transplant

Great whites could have wiped out megalodon

Ants trained to sniff out breast tumours

Sex change seen in live-birth animal

Really brief

Some disease risks rise with your height

School road noise slows gains in attentiveness and memory

Robo falcon makes a great bird scarer

Adding to the team • AI is becoming smarter all the time, but mathematicians needn’t fear they will be replaced by machine intelligence, argues Junaid Mubeen

Field notes from space-time • Why planes fly We physicists want to give everyone a feel for what we are learning, but the truth is that physics and intuition don’t always mix, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Fragile beauty

Your letters

Living by numbers • Can big data help us make better life decisions? A thought-provoking book says it can – but Elle Hunt finds some important holes in the argument

The ascent of mammals • The story of the evolutionary origin of mammals is told with elan in this clear, engaging book, finds Michael Marshall

Don’t miss

The film column • The need for speed Part war film, part techno-thriller, Top Gun: Maverick might lack narrative realism, but this 1980s nostalgia-fest is still a thrilling display of aeronautical stunts, featuring some very fast planes, says Simon Ings

Lifting the fog • Brain fog is a nebulous concept that eluded scientific scrutiny – until covid-19 thrust it into the spotlight. Kayt Sukel reports

Virunga power • Green electricity is empowering people, reducing conflict and helping to conserve mountain gorillas in the heart of Africa, finds Adam Popescu

Dangerous work

Gorilla killers

Virtually famous • Computer-generated influencers look, sound and post on social media like real humans. What impact are they having on people who follow them, asks Tevy Kuch

How to bake bread that keeps • The science of why bread goes stale isn’t fully understood. But it can help us...


Expand title description text