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New Scientist

Aug 13 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Running dry • Even rainy nations like the UK must act now to protect against future droughts

New Scientist

US steps up climate action • The US Senate has passed the Inflation Reduction Act, featuring the largest climate package in US history, reports James Dinneen

Ancient bronze recipe deciphered • Mystery ingredients mentioned in an ancient Chinese text were probably pre-made alloys

Artificial neuron swaps dopamine with rat brain cells

Long covid struck 1 in 8 adults who got infected

Other coronaviruses shape covid-19 response

How cryptocurrencies get hacked • Digital currencies are designed to be “unhackable”, but that doesn’t mean funds are safe from criminals, says Matthew Sparkes

Young mice age when given blood from older animals

Dog disease mutation edited out • CRISPR editing could prevent a common genetic condition in Labradors

Gamma ray bursts could unpack universe expansion

Early humans killed off turtle species millions of years ago

How to shop for eco-friendly food in the supermarket

JWST spots cosmic cartwheel… • Stunning galaxy has ripples made of stars and gas

…and two galaxies smashing together

Earphone can ‘hear’ commands user is silently mouthing

Virus-resistant E. coli could be used in drug production

Organs kept alive after heart stops • An artificial blood substitute tested in pigs could make more organs available for transplants, and one day might even reverse death, reports Clare Wilson

Alaska’s record-breaking fires • Wildfires have torn through three times as much territory in the region than usual, and fire season isn’t over. Lois Parshley looks at what this could mean for the Arctic

How weevils have become weapons in the UK’s fight against invasive plants

Quantum computers better at Wordle than classical ones

Thumbs up for video call hand signals

First steps towards a bronchiolitis vaccine

Meat-eating plant has a trick to ensure it gets a meal

Really brief

Drilling deep • Millimetre-wave beam technology could tap deep geothermal energy. The world must work together to make it happen, says Eugene Linden

No planet B • Natural law Chile’s draft constitution has an almost unparalleled commitment to the environment. If adopted, it would make Chile the first truly ecological state, says Graham Lawton

Space invaders

Your letters

What a dead whale can tell us • A beaked whale carcass washed up on a Scottish beach in 2018, part of a mass stranding across multiple coasts. It is now at the heart of an artistic challenge to the military, finds David Stock

No norms here • There is no such thing as normal for humans, argues a new book. Simon Ings investigates

Don’t miss

The TV column • In real life Five Days at Memorial, based on the book by Sheri Fink, tells the shocking stories of health workers and patients whose lives are changed forever as Hurricane Katrina overwhelms a hospital in 2005. Bethan Ackerley explores

Shhhhh… • In an increasingly noisy world, finding the right kind of quiet can have a dramatic impact on your body and mind, finds Kayt Sukel

How to be silent

Silence in the city

The universe by numbers • A handful of bizarre, mind-blowing figures, whether...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Aug 13 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: August 11, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Running dry • Even rainy nations like the UK must act now to protect against future droughts

New Scientist

US steps up climate action • The US Senate has passed the Inflation Reduction Act, featuring the largest climate package in US history, reports James Dinneen

Ancient bronze recipe deciphered • Mystery ingredients mentioned in an ancient Chinese text were probably pre-made alloys

Artificial neuron swaps dopamine with rat brain cells

Long covid struck 1 in 8 adults who got infected

Other coronaviruses shape covid-19 response

How cryptocurrencies get hacked • Digital currencies are designed to be “unhackable”, but that doesn’t mean funds are safe from criminals, says Matthew Sparkes

Young mice age when given blood from older animals

Dog disease mutation edited out • CRISPR editing could prevent a common genetic condition in Labradors

Gamma ray bursts could unpack universe expansion

Early humans killed off turtle species millions of years ago

How to shop for eco-friendly food in the supermarket

JWST spots cosmic cartwheel… • Stunning galaxy has ripples made of stars and gas

…and two galaxies smashing together

Earphone can ‘hear’ commands user is silently mouthing

Virus-resistant E. coli could be used in drug production

Organs kept alive after heart stops • An artificial blood substitute tested in pigs could make more organs available for transplants, and one day might even reverse death, reports Clare Wilson

Alaska’s record-breaking fires • Wildfires have torn through three times as much territory in the region than usual, and fire season isn’t over. Lois Parshley looks at what this could mean for the Arctic

How weevils have become weapons in the UK’s fight against invasive plants

Quantum computers better at Wordle than classical ones

Thumbs up for video call hand signals

First steps towards a bronchiolitis vaccine

Meat-eating plant has a trick to ensure it gets a meal

Really brief

Drilling deep • Millimetre-wave beam technology could tap deep geothermal energy. The world must work together to make it happen, says Eugene Linden

No planet B • Natural law Chile’s draft constitution has an almost unparalleled commitment to the environment. If adopted, it would make Chile the first truly ecological state, says Graham Lawton

Space invaders

Your letters

What a dead whale can tell us • A beaked whale carcass washed up on a Scottish beach in 2018, part of a mass stranding across multiple coasts. It is now at the heart of an artistic challenge to the military, finds David Stock

No norms here • There is no such thing as normal for humans, argues a new book. Simon Ings investigates

Don’t miss

The TV column • In real life Five Days at Memorial, based on the book by Sheri Fink, tells the shocking stories of health workers and patients whose lives are changed forever as Hurricane Katrina overwhelms a hospital in 2005. Bethan Ackerley explores

Shhhhh… • In an increasingly noisy world, finding the right kind of quiet can have a dramatic impact on your body and mind, finds Kayt Sukel

How to be silent

Silence in the city

The universe by numbers • A handful of bizarre, mind-blowing figures, whether...


Expand title description text