Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

New Scientist

Jul 30 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Monkeypox failings • More could have been done to prevent a global emergency

New Scientist

Monkeypox emergency • As cases surge, the WHO has raised its alert level and said nations must do more to combat the disease, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

‘Net-zero’ aviation won’t be enough • Efforts to make flying greener mostly only account for carbon dioxide emissions

We don’t actually know what ‘growing pains’ are

JWST spots oldest ever galaxy…

…and a glut of Milky Way-shaped galaxies

AI art tool covertly alters requests • Apparent efforts to improve the diversity of pictures created by artificial intelligence DALL-E 2 have been criticised for a lack of transparency, reports Matthew Sparkes

Robot learns social cues to feed people at appropriate times

Gene-edited dogs created from cloned skin cells

Science lab module joins China’s Tiangong space station

Hibernating beetles break down and regrow their muscles

Murujuga, Western Australia • Ancient Aboriginal art could reveal Australia’s environmental past Murujuga holds millions of engravings from at least 50,000 years ago – and could provide a glimpse into climate change, says Alice Klein

UK lab for clever birds saved from closure by public donations

Firing a laser into the sky can redirect lightning’s path

Coronavirus • Concerns over catching covid-19 in hospital The coronavirus may become a potential hazard of going to hospital unless we introduce new measures to stop the spread, says Clare Wilson

No link between depression and serotonin, finds major analysis

Inner ears reveal when animals evolved warm blood

Coronavirus may enter brain via nanotube tunnels

UK government’s headache over net-zero strategy • Following a legal battle, the country’s next prime minister will have to sign off on a new climate plan, says Adam Vaughan

Covid-19 may raise premature birth risk

Fish took ‘backward’ step in evolution

Enceladus’s oceans may be right saltiness for life

Really brief

The nature divide • Going birding made a huge difference to my family’s mental health. Access to nature must be a right, not a privilege, says Mya-Rose Craig

My botanical life • Is grass always greener? Artificial lawns have grown in popularity, but there are major drawbacks, says Beronda L. Montgomery, who is looking for an eco-friendly alternative

Editor’s pick

Hunting universal truths • Some of cosmology’s hardest questions relate to the universe’s origins and the hunt for dark matter. Michael Brooks explores two new books taking them on

Human stories • A Spanish bestseller about evolution celebrates curiosity itself, finds Rebecca Wragg Sykes

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • Hope is an action verb In Emmi Itäranta’s The Moonday Letters, humans have adapted to the environments of their off-world habitats. While a cataclysm looms, at the heart of this genre-crashing thrill ride is an unexpected duty, says Sally Adee

INVENTORY OF THE UNIVERSE

The dark side of daydreaming • Mind wandering can be fun and surprisingly rewarding, but it has a sinister side too. Eric Taipale reports

Who is at risk?

Beyond the bicarb volcano • Home-made science “experiments” are full of spectacle, but often miss the joy of...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Jul 30 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: July 28, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Monkeypox failings • More could have been done to prevent a global emergency

New Scientist

Monkeypox emergency • As cases surge, the WHO has raised its alert level and said nations must do more to combat the disease, reports Jason Arunn Murugesu

‘Net-zero’ aviation won’t be enough • Efforts to make flying greener mostly only account for carbon dioxide emissions

We don’t actually know what ‘growing pains’ are

JWST spots oldest ever galaxy…

…and a glut of Milky Way-shaped galaxies

AI art tool covertly alters requests • Apparent efforts to improve the diversity of pictures created by artificial intelligence DALL-E 2 have been criticised for a lack of transparency, reports Matthew Sparkes

Robot learns social cues to feed people at appropriate times

Gene-edited dogs created from cloned skin cells

Science lab module joins China’s Tiangong space station

Hibernating beetles break down and regrow their muscles

Murujuga, Western Australia • Ancient Aboriginal art could reveal Australia’s environmental past Murujuga holds millions of engravings from at least 50,000 years ago – and could provide a glimpse into climate change, says Alice Klein

UK lab for clever birds saved from closure by public donations

Firing a laser into the sky can redirect lightning’s path

Coronavirus • Concerns over catching covid-19 in hospital The coronavirus may become a potential hazard of going to hospital unless we introduce new measures to stop the spread, says Clare Wilson

No link between depression and serotonin, finds major analysis

Inner ears reveal when animals evolved warm blood

Coronavirus may enter brain via nanotube tunnels

UK government’s headache over net-zero strategy • Following a legal battle, the country’s next prime minister will have to sign off on a new climate plan, says Adam Vaughan

Covid-19 may raise premature birth risk

Fish took ‘backward’ step in evolution

Enceladus’s oceans may be right saltiness for life

Really brief

The nature divide • Going birding made a huge difference to my family’s mental health. Access to nature must be a right, not a privilege, says Mya-Rose Craig

My botanical life • Is grass always greener? Artificial lawns have grown in popularity, but there are major drawbacks, says Beronda L. Montgomery, who is looking for an eco-friendly alternative

Editor’s pick

Hunting universal truths • Some of cosmology’s hardest questions relate to the universe’s origins and the hunt for dark matter. Michael Brooks explores two new books taking them on

Human stories • A Spanish bestseller about evolution celebrates curiosity itself, finds Rebecca Wragg Sykes

Don’t miss

The sci-fi column • Hope is an action verb In Emmi Itäranta’s The Moonday Letters, humans have adapted to the environments of their off-world habitats. While a cataclysm looms, at the heart of this genre-crashing thrill ride is an unexpected duty, says Sally Adee

INVENTORY OF THE UNIVERSE

The dark side of daydreaming • Mind wandering can be fun and surprisingly rewarding, but it has a sinister side too. Eric Taipale reports

Who is at risk?

Beyond the bicarb volcano • Home-made science “experiments” are full of spectacle, but often miss the joy of...


Expand title description text