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New Scientist

Apr 23 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Save our seas • Problems caused by our exploitation of the oceans need the same focus as on land

New Scientist

UK targeted by spyware • Researchers claim Pegasus software was used in cyberattacks against the prime minister’s office, reports Matthew Sparkes

A quantum of consciousness • Experiments on tiny structures in brain cells bolster the idea that quantum effects might explain consciousness, finds Thomas Lewton

Driverless cars could be tricked into crashing

Viruses help treat acne in mice

Tiny structures in rock might be earliest known fossils of life on our planet

19th-century dairy farming women didn’t breastfeed

Lost flower rediscovered • The mignonette leek orchid was presumed extinct for almost a century

How to spy the universe’s first black holes

Is covid-19 causing diabetes? • Many clinics are reporting people diagnosed with diabetes during or soon after an infection with the coronavirus – but the picture is complicated, reports Clare Wilson

People tend to believe populations are more diverse than they are

DNA-based device could precisely track subatomic particles

Drones track disease in olive trees • High-tech tools will help monitor crops for infection with Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium that has devastated the olive industry in southern Italy, reports Priscille Biehlmann

Carbon removal project in Iceland forced to adapt to punishing freeze

Male toad clings to female for months for chance to mate

Origami-inspired robot could deliver drugs in the body

Transplanted immune cells show promise for multiple sclerosis

Temperature swings warn of coming forest losses in the Amazon

Blind cavefish are developing local accents

Monkeys have a human-like sense of their own heartbeat

Meningitis vaccine cuts gonorrhoea rate

AI helps improve quake monitoring

Really brief

Foam and laser help us probe star birth

This is why vegan sausages aren’t quite like meaty ones

Shoulder growth slows before birth

Do you hear what I hear? • We live in a world brimming with sonic wonders, but these riches are under assault. We need to listen, says David George Haskell

A small price to pay • High-income nations must transfer some of their wealth to low-income ones to make amends for the damage they have done to the environment, writes Graham Lawton

Fragile beauty

Your letters

Worst days in the world • The extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs and forged a radically different future for Earth is captured in a must-read, says Simon Ings

Hanging on in there • A nail-biting documentary about a trek to climb a remote mountain has an unexpected star, finds Gregory Wakeman

Don’t miss

Currents in time • The new novel from Station Eleven’s author is a fascinating tale of time travel – with disturbing glimpses of our pandemic-strewn future, says Clare Wilson

THE BLUE ACCELERATION • Humanity’s expansionist drive is increasingly taking us into the deep ocean. How can we balance that with vital environmental protections, asks Graham Lawton

WHAT MAKES THE OCEANS DIFFERENT? • Switching to more sustainable development on land is hard enough, but the OECD report The Ocean Economy in 2030 sets out nine things that make...


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Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Apr 23 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: April 21, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Save our seas • Problems caused by our exploitation of the oceans need the same focus as on land

New Scientist

UK targeted by spyware • Researchers claim Pegasus software was used in cyberattacks against the prime minister’s office, reports Matthew Sparkes

A quantum of consciousness • Experiments on tiny structures in brain cells bolster the idea that quantum effects might explain consciousness, finds Thomas Lewton

Driverless cars could be tricked into crashing

Viruses help treat acne in mice

Tiny structures in rock might be earliest known fossils of life on our planet

19th-century dairy farming women didn’t breastfeed

Lost flower rediscovered • The mignonette leek orchid was presumed extinct for almost a century

How to spy the universe’s first black holes

Is covid-19 causing diabetes? • Many clinics are reporting people diagnosed with diabetes during or soon after an infection with the coronavirus – but the picture is complicated, reports Clare Wilson

People tend to believe populations are more diverse than they are

DNA-based device could precisely track subatomic particles

Drones track disease in olive trees • High-tech tools will help monitor crops for infection with Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium that has devastated the olive industry in southern Italy, reports Priscille Biehlmann

Carbon removal project in Iceland forced to adapt to punishing freeze

Male toad clings to female for months for chance to mate

Origami-inspired robot could deliver drugs in the body

Transplanted immune cells show promise for multiple sclerosis

Temperature swings warn of coming forest losses in the Amazon

Blind cavefish are developing local accents

Monkeys have a human-like sense of their own heartbeat

Meningitis vaccine cuts gonorrhoea rate

AI helps improve quake monitoring

Really brief

Foam and laser help us probe star birth

This is why vegan sausages aren’t quite like meaty ones

Shoulder growth slows before birth

Do you hear what I hear? • We live in a world brimming with sonic wonders, but these riches are under assault. We need to listen, says David George Haskell

A small price to pay • High-income nations must transfer some of their wealth to low-income ones to make amends for the damage they have done to the environment, writes Graham Lawton

Fragile beauty

Your letters

Worst days in the world • The extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs and forged a radically different future for Earth is captured in a must-read, says Simon Ings

Hanging on in there • A nail-biting documentary about a trek to climb a remote mountain has an unexpected star, finds Gregory Wakeman

Don’t miss

Currents in time • The new novel from Station Eleven’s author is a fascinating tale of time travel – with disturbing glimpses of our pandemic-strewn future, says Clare Wilson

THE BLUE ACCELERATION • Humanity’s expansionist drive is increasingly taking us into the deep ocean. How can we balance that with vital environmental protections, asks Graham Lawton

WHAT MAKES THE OCEANS DIFFERENT? • Switching to more sustainable development on land is hard enough, but the OECD report The Ocean Economy in 2030 sets out nine things that make...


Expand title description text