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New Scientist

Feb 19 2022
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Listen and learn • A collaborative approach is needed to avoid the next pandemic

New Scientist

Removing restrictions • Countries worldwide are having to decide what “living with covid” really looks like, report Alex Wilkins and Carissa Wong

The dream of ending child cancer • Is it possible to prevent all children dying from cancer? Alice Klein reports

Rare ‘hyperburst’ is powerful nuclear explosion in space

Lichens may take a million years to adapt to 1°C of global warming

Microwave weapon lets drones shoot down other drones

Facebook anti-vaccine policy worked briefly

‘Cold blob’ may be slowing loss from Iceland’s glaciers

Pig organ trials may start soon • After completing a human trial of modified pig skin grafts last year, a team in China hopes to start the first pig organ transplant trial, reports Michael Le Page

Modern humans moved into cave one year after Neanderthals abandoned it

Spiderwebs may be the world’s most sensitive ‘ears’

Yoga at least once a week may help to lower blood pressure

US Army supplier to ditch depleted uranium rounds

Nuclear fusion record suggests we really could build artificial suns

Cricket has strongest known bite of any insect in the world

The race to capture carbon • Myriad inventive ways of removing greenhouse gases from the air are turning from dreams into reality. Adam Vaughan reports

From food to forestry

Barn owl’s tail could inspire more efficient flying drones

Habitable world may be orbiting dead star

AI beats world’s best video game drivers

Really brief

Possible Alzheimer’s link to sleep is found

Here’s how you need to eat in order to live 10 years longer

Coal ash could supply vital metals for tech

Trouble in the metaverse • Throughout history, there has been backlash to technological progress – so why should now be any different, asks James Ball

Field notes from space-time • Do look down We shouldn’t only celebrate spacecraft staring out at the universe, but also those turned on Earth, helping us live better on our own planet, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Bearbnb

Your letters

Sharing the seas • The question of who owns the oceans and who gets to enjoy their spoils has more than a whiff of colonialism about it, finds Simon Ings

Bad moon rising • Finally, a disaster movie without a message and that is fun to watch, says Leah Crane

Don’t miss

The film column • From Russia with flu A surreal and sometimes exhausting journey through one man’s delirium provides an ambitious and mischievous take on history, aliens and the human mind, finds Simon Ings

Making a mind • In the push to make artificial intelligence that thinks like humans, many researchers are focused on fresh insights from neuroscience. Should they be looking to psychology instead, asks Edd Gent

Are you sitting comfortably? • If you worry that slouching is causing you long-term discomfort, think again. It is time to rewrite the rules of perfect posture and find the real cause of our aches and pains, asks Alison George

Change your posture to change your mood

Stop the stoop

In from the cold • As ice and frozen soil around the world melts, potentially deadly microbes that have lain...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Weekly Pages: 60 Publisher: New Scientist Ltd Edition: Feb 19 2022

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: February 17, 2022

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Listen and learn • A collaborative approach is needed to avoid the next pandemic

New Scientist

Removing restrictions • Countries worldwide are having to decide what “living with covid” really looks like, report Alex Wilkins and Carissa Wong

The dream of ending child cancer • Is it possible to prevent all children dying from cancer? Alice Klein reports

Rare ‘hyperburst’ is powerful nuclear explosion in space

Lichens may take a million years to adapt to 1°C of global warming

Microwave weapon lets drones shoot down other drones

Facebook anti-vaccine policy worked briefly

‘Cold blob’ may be slowing loss from Iceland’s glaciers

Pig organ trials may start soon • After completing a human trial of modified pig skin grafts last year, a team in China hopes to start the first pig organ transplant trial, reports Michael Le Page

Modern humans moved into cave one year after Neanderthals abandoned it

Spiderwebs may be the world’s most sensitive ‘ears’

Yoga at least once a week may help to lower blood pressure

US Army supplier to ditch depleted uranium rounds

Nuclear fusion record suggests we really could build artificial suns

Cricket has strongest known bite of any insect in the world

The race to capture carbon • Myriad inventive ways of removing greenhouse gases from the air are turning from dreams into reality. Adam Vaughan reports

From food to forestry

Barn owl’s tail could inspire more efficient flying drones

Habitable world may be orbiting dead star

AI beats world’s best video game drivers

Really brief

Possible Alzheimer’s link to sleep is found

Here’s how you need to eat in order to live 10 years longer

Coal ash could supply vital metals for tech

Trouble in the metaverse • Throughout history, there has been backlash to technological progress – so why should now be any different, asks James Ball

Field notes from space-time • Do look down We shouldn’t only celebrate spacecraft staring out at the universe, but also those turned on Earth, helping us live better on our own planet, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

Bearbnb

Your letters

Sharing the seas • The question of who owns the oceans and who gets to enjoy their spoils has more than a whiff of colonialism about it, finds Simon Ings

Bad moon rising • Finally, a disaster movie without a message and that is fun to watch, says Leah Crane

Don’t miss

The film column • From Russia with flu A surreal and sometimes exhausting journey through one man’s delirium provides an ambitious and mischievous take on history, aliens and the human mind, finds Simon Ings

Making a mind • In the push to make artificial intelligence that thinks like humans, many researchers are focused on fresh insights from neuroscience. Should they be looking to psychology instead, asks Edd Gent

Are you sitting comfortably? • If you worry that slouching is causing you long-term discomfort, think again. It is time to rewrite the rules of perfect posture and find the real cause of our aches and pains, asks Alison George

Change your posture to change your mood

Stop the stoop

In from the cold • As ice and frozen soil around the world melts, potentially deadly microbes that have lain...


Expand title description text